Without a keen understanding of pertinent anatomy and physiology, students will struggle to apply pathology and pharmacology throughout their training and practice.   MedGuide are happy to introduce this series of MCQ sets comprising core clinically-relevant physiology pulled from many sources common to the medical school undergraduate.  We hope this allows you to test your knowledge, and apply synoptic links to some key preclinical conditions you will encounter as a practising healthcare professional.  

 

Reviewed by: awaiting review

Gastrointestinal Physiology Review MCQ - Part 2

Congratulations - you have completed Gastrointestinal Physiology Review MCQ - Part 2 . You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1
Which of the following is not considered a primary organ of digestion?
A
Salivary glands
B
Oesophagus
C
Stomach
D
Duodenum
Question 1 Explanation: 
The salivary glands, teeth, gallbladder and liver and accessory, or secondary, organs of digestion. The gut tube constituents, directly, are said to be the primary organs of digestion.
Question 2
Which gastrointestinal wall layer contain most of the lymphoid tissue?
A
Lamina propria
B
Muscularis mucosa
C
Submucosa
D
Epithelium of the mucosa
Question 2 Explanation: 
The histology of the GI tract is divided into the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and adventita/serosa. Note that within the mucosa lie the epithelia, lamina propria and muscularis mucosae.
Question 3

Stem 1 of 4

A 3-day-old neonate with abdominal swelling has been vomiting a green pigment.  An abdominal XR is ordered, revealing a megacolon sign.
The pigmented vomit is suggestive of obstruction distal to ...
A
The inferior vena cava
B
The Auerbach's plexus
C
The ileocaecal valve
D
The major duodenal papilla
Question 3 Explanation: 
XR is a very common shorthand for X-ray. Note that this green pigment is most probably, if not dietary, bile. Thus the obstruction has to occur distal to the major duodenal papilla (site of bile drainage into the tract) for there to be a presence of it in the colon.
Question 4

Stem 2 of 4

The patient's biopsy finds an absence of submucosal ganglionic cells.  Which cell type has failed to migrate, in embryology, to its in vivo site?
A
Mesenchyme
B
Neural crest
C
Mesoderm
D
Ectoderm
Question 4 Explanation: 
In vivo refers to "in life". In this instance, it is where you expect the neural crest cells to be located within a normal person's anatomy.
Question 5

Stem 3 of 4

Untreated, what would be the risk to the patient?
A
Rupture
B
Paradoxical diarrhoea
C
Cholestasis
D
Haemoptysis
Question 6

Stem 4 of 4

Which of the below is the most appropriate diagnosis of the patient?
A
Meckel's Diverticulum
B
Ileotomy
C
Crohn's disease
D
Hirschsprung Disease
Question 6 Explanation: 
This congenital disease, called Hirschsprung, is the result of an agenesis of the enteric nervous system resulting in tonic contracture and subsequent stasis of the bolus. Therefore, the patient has a proximal-megacolon, no stool passage and subsequent emesis.
Question 7
Which of the following could be successfully absorbed without sufficient mastication?
A
Red meat
B
Broccoli
C
Chicken
D
Fish
Question 7 Explanation: 
Fish does not require mastication to be absorbed. The others require a considerable amount of mechanical digestion to enable adequate surface area for chemical digestion to be useful.
Question 8
Which of the following is not a function of saliva?
A
Commence polysaccharide digestion
B
Commence lipid digestion
C
Coat teeth with protective protease
D
Moisten foodstuff for swallowing
Question 8 Explanation: 
The teeth are coated, but not by protease. Rather by proline-rich protein.
Question 9
Calcium-dependent activation of apical transporters causes a change of the acinar salivary unit. Which ion is transported out as a direct consequence of this activation?
A
K+
B
Cl-
C
Na+
D
Ca++
Question 9 Explanation: 
Cl- exits in this manner, drawing the cation Na+. As a result, we get movement of water into the lumen.
Question 10
The basolateral surface of acinar cells contain the class of transporter also inhibited by furosemide in the nephron.  What is this transporter called?
A
ENaC
B
NaCl cotranspoter
C
NKCC2
D
NaK ATPase antiporter
Question 10 Explanation: 
This transporter is also seen in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and inhibited in its action by loop diuretics (LDs) such as furosemide.
Once you are finished, click the button below. Any items you have not completed will be marked incorrect. Get Results
There are 10 questions to complete.

Spotted an error?

1 + 15 =