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Introduction to Inflammation MCQ

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Question 1
There are two types of immune response: acute and chronic.  Using your knowledge of "inflammation" generally speaking, and which type of immune response it comes under, which cell is involved in inflammation acutely?
A
Neutrophil
B
T lymphocyte
C
Memory cell
D
Plasma cell
Question 2
Which of the following is not a function of inflammation?
A
Delivery of leucocytes
B
Concentration of toxins
C
Restoration of tissue physiology
D
Vasodilation
Question 2 Explanation: 
Rather than concentrate toxins, the increased interstitial permeability leads to their relative dilution.
Question 3
What typifies chronic inflammation?
A
immediate defensive reaction
B
vascular and exudative processes predominate
C
transient inflammation
D
scar tissue formation
Question 4
Which of the following are not classic signs of acute inflammation
A
rubor
B
dolor
C
collagen deposition
D
loss of function
Question 4 Explanation: 
rubor, dolor, calor, tumour and loss of function are all the classic hallmarks of inflammation (that is redness, pain, heat, swelling in the latin forms respectively)
Question 5
If you were to look at an acute inflammation episode with a light microscope, what would you find?
A
keloid formation
B
satellite cells
C
collagen deposition
D
leucocyte infiltration diffusely
Question 5 Explanation: 
vascular and granulation tissue (leucocytes termed neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils) typify the acute inflammatory response.
Question 6
Which does not typify acute inflammation?
A
caspase enzyme accumluation
B
dead cell, debris and fluid vesicle formation
C
SLE
D
keloid formation
Question 7
Which of the following is a low-risk for chronic inflammation?
A
AIDS
B
bed sores for the bed-bound
C
suture material left in situ
D
first-degree burn
Question 8
A patient with history of unstable angina presents with STEMI. They are given ASA, oxygen, morphine and transferred to a cardiac catheterisation laboratory where blood flow is restored for their blocked PIVA.  In the aftermath, chronic inflammation has damaged the heart about the ischaemic foci. Were a sample to be taken of the infarct region, which process would be observable that has resulted in reduced cardiac functionality?
A
Loss of troponin enzymes
B
Neovascularisation
C
Fibrosis
D
Coagulative necrosis
Question 9
Cytotoxic T lymphocyte infiltrate of tissue is a sign of?
A
acute inflammation
B
chronic inflammation
C
ischaemic foci
D
caseous necrosis
Question 10
Which of the following is a classical pattern of inflammation?
A
Keloid
B
Caseous
C
Serous
D
Monopathic
Question 10 Explanation: 
GUS is the mnemonic to remember common patterns of inflammation: granuloma, ulcer, suppuration, serous and fibrinous.
Question 11
A patient with insidious fever, haemoptysis and recurrent URTI has a lung parenchyma granuloma pathologically assessed. What will the outer ring of the granuloma show?
A
Eosinophil
B
Lymphocytes
C
Necrosis
D
Basophils
Question 12
A granuloma has formed on the skin surface post laceration.  What is the inner collar about the necrotic tissue?
A
T cell
B
B cell
C
NK cell
D
Macrophage
Question 13
An aphthous break in the mucosal epithelium is defined as
A
An ulcer
B
A granuloma
C
A serous inflammatory event
D
A suppuration
Question 13 Explanation: 
An epithelial break is an ulcer by definition.
Question 14
A patient with 12 month history of diffuse epigastric pain presents. The history is worse with lying down, shortly after eating and with hot drinks.  Given the most likely diagnosis, which of the above would you not expect of his chronic lesion within the submucosa of the duodenal bulb?
A
Fibrous scar
B
Acute Inflammatory exudate
C
Vascular granulation tissue
D
Fibrovascular granulation tissue
Question 14 Explanation: 
This is a difficult question requiring multiple orders of thinking. The case above is textbook pyrosis second to a chronic ulcer. Most peptic ulcers reside in the duodenal bulb, confirmed in the stem. Thus, we can say there is a chronic ulcer in the proximal small bowel. The question asks about the non submucosal constituents of this lesion. Well the mucosal layer is the ulcer, the submucosal is the acute inflammatory exudate and vascular/fibrovascular granulation tissue, with the final layer been the fibrous scar within the muscularis propria layer. Thus, given the options above, this latter one is the answer.
Question 15
Given the patient described in the above question, what kind of fluid accumulation has occurred?
A
Gangrenous
B
Caseous
C
Serous
D
Fibrinous
Question 15 Explanation: 
We have ascertained this is a chronic ulcer. Thus the vocabulary for a chronic accumulation of fluid is a fibrinous type.
Question 16
In which of the following scenarios is suppuration most likely to occur primarily?
A
CVA of the parietal lobe
B
First-degree burn
C
Myocardial infarct
D
Comminuted bimalleolar fracture
Question 17
A patient with cycling diarrhoea-constipation, stool including blood on occasion and unexplained weight loss has a colonoscopy where localised mural inflammation is seen. A sample is taken. The results include: granulomatous skip lesions w transmural inflammation. Which is the most appropriate diagnosis?
A
Biliary cancer
B
IBS
C
Crohn's disease
D
Ulcerative colitis
Question 18
A similar patient presentation has a sample taken with the following pathologist report:
'lesions were isolated to the sigmoid colon with readily bleeding inflamed regions.  Ulceration was noted to be confined to the mucosal layer only'.
What is the most appropriate diagnosis?
A
Crohn's disease
B
Ulcerative colitis
C
Bowel cancer
D
IBS
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